Leaf of the Tree

Finding the Divine in the Details


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Through the heart’s doorway

HEALING REMEDIES

Photo: Lara Kearns

 

The door to my heart opens inward. I move through forgiveness to love.

~Louise Hay

We suffer because our interactions with others do not meet the expectations we did not know we had.

~ James Patrick McDonald

Self Care is … letting yourself sit on the couch an extra hour because you know that will be more productive than stressing out.

~ Soul Pancake

Both fear and faith demand you believe in something you cannot see. Have faith in the best outcome, instead of fear of the worst.

~ Law of Attraction

Within the seed of mindfulness is the seed of concentration. With these two energies, we can liberate ourselves from afflictions.

~Thich Nhat Hanh


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Our unique spiritual fingerprint

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Photo: Karen Olin Darling

When we give or receive acts of service, we become engaged in the process of investigating our own reality and gradually, more is revealed about who we really are.

In that process, we gradually disperse the dust and veils of an illusory identity that has been formed by living in a culture that is immersed in blind imitation of the past. Once those veils are lifted, we encounter and discover our true and unique individual identity.

The process begins with a genuine act of service that is always motivated by the attributes of God that are latent within each of our hearts. It is our free-will decision that brings forth these “gems of inestimable value”.  shellIMG_4785

How we choose to show love, receive forgiveness, and express other attributes in an act of service is our own spiritual fingerprint, and just like our physical fingerprint, it is unique to us.

Nobody in the past, present or future will love exactly the same way that each of us does.

Each time that we give or receive, an attribute of God — a facet of the infinite jewel — is revealed. In this way we make an invaluable contribution because we have added to what can be perceived of divinity. WTOEimage.php

And because we are all capable of making such a contribution, this means that each individual is absolutely indispensable.

Excerpted from With Thine Own Eyes: Why Imitate the Past When We Can Investigate Reality?

Find more about the book at:

http://www.amazon.com/With-Thine-Own-Eyes-Investigate-ebook/dp/B00I1JPC7I/ref=pd_sim_kstore_11?ie=UTF8&refRID=0TQC490J7FVBRTJWM70H

Print version at: http://www.bahairesources.com/with-thine-own-eyes.html


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To forgive the world

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Photo: David Campbell

After both of my parents had died, I put off sorting through the boxes of their belongings that came back to my house.

Then I woke one day with the urge to explore them.

I was plunged into stirred-up memories and stored-up feelings.

As if whispered into my thoughts, an idea I’d encountered years ago in the work of psychologist Erik Blumenthal reminded:

“The person who comes to understand his parents can forgive the world.”

The writer, who grew up Jewish in Nazi Germany, knew firsthand how painful experience often makes forgiveness seem impossible. Yet he emphasized two needs that he believed eventually call to each of us: to become more understanding, beyond our rigid “certainties”, and to accept the freedom that forgiveness bestows. ErikB2index

As I unpacked my parents’ things, I gained a deeper view of what they had faced and the weight of the efforts and decisions they made. When they met, they were two people in their 20s entering a cross-cultural marriage at a time when no one knew what the next day would bring, who would live or die, or even what language everyone would be speaking, depending on the outcome of the biggest war the world had known.

I can now see, and appreciate even more fully, that whatever their circumstances, troubles, and significant mistakes or missteps, they made a place for me in this world, and stuck with that commitment.

I’m reminded of words of Rumi’s:

“When you eventually see through the veils to how things really are, you will keep saying again and again, this is certainly not like we thought it was.”

As I uncovered a broader view of my parents’ lives, I could see that most of my own resistance to forgiveness was forged at a stage when the imprint of my parents’ perceived omnipotence led me to believe that they were always in charge, in the know, in control of all situations.

I now share with them the certainty that that was never true, and the humbling realization that, whatever the hurts, it is not, indeed, as I thought it was. LAFS6377506

It’s been observed that many people hold back from forgiveness because they believe it might go against the grain of justice, might excuse a wrong or deny its occurrence.

But when we find a willingness to see beyond our own view about any situation, especially the actions and choices of others, it disarms that tendency our perception has to keep us wedded to beliefs that not only make us feel bad, but impede our healing and progress, too.

Adapted from Life at First Sight: Finding the Divine in the Details.


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A leaf in the wind

 

Most grateful today to share the words of Guest Writer Esther Bradley-DeTally:

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Photo: David Campbell / http://GBCTours.com

Forgiveness

By Esther Bradley-DeTally

To everything but anguish the mind will soon adjust … ~ Roger White

 

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Photo: David Campbell / http://GBCTours.com

After a great wound no feeling comes
A white hot pain settles upon you
You stand in the fire of agony shivering
“Forgive them Father, they know not what they do,”
is a whispered voice, wrapped in cumulus clouds,
Tributaries of feeling blocked, the heart a mere stump
Enough, enough, enough

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Photo: David Campbell / http://GBCTours.com

The well-intentioned speak of forgiveness skippingly on the tongue
Turn the other cheek produces a yellow, curled up feeling within
You’ve turned the other cheek so much, you have whiplash, and
your chiropractor is upping his fees.

You are so done
Chumped out by the world
Sick of greed lurch on the planet
Numb to the scalding rhetoric of gossip,
absolute abandonment of your Lord’s teaching
on mercy, on love Thy neighbor,

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Photo: David Campbell / http://GBCTours.com

Dormancy is a tickling feeling
You feel your dormancy and know despite
Not wanting to, you are coming to life
It’s a crucible this world, and you have
Gone through the white heat of change
Ignorance and love will not cohabit within
You cast away the purple bruise of resentment
Which led you to the heart of your journey.
Your crucible.

You will no longer resent
You will not forget
Never forget
But, you are a leaf in the wind
Of the Will of your Lord

And you will love again. E.-Bradley-DeTally-175x26211

Copyright © Esther Bradley-DeTally
Writer Esther Bradley-DeTally teaches writing and traveled from Moscow to Siberia, and to Ukraine, then returned with her husband to live in Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine, and Minsk, Belarus. 

She is the author of Without a Net: A Sojourn in Russia and You Carry the Heavy Stuff.

Her blog can be found at: http://SorryGnat.wordpress.com .

 


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The freedom in forgiveness

Happy to have some thoughts up at BoomerCafé this week.

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This stage of life brings a continual sorting through others’ belongings – and an invitation to forgiveness I never expected.

I put off this task after my parents’ death, as many of us do, simply stashed the boxes out of sight. Then I woke one day with the urge to unpack one.

I was plunged into stirred-up memories and stored-up feelings, not all of them easy or pleasant. As if whispered into my thoughts, an idea I’d encountered years ago in the work of psychologist Erik Blumenthal echoed: The person who comes to understand his parents can forgive the world.

Read the rest: