Leaf of the Tree

Finding the Divine in the Details


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Happy February, Munich Girl

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KINDLE  0.99 special

for WWII fiction THE MUNICH GIRL

through Feb. 10

 

February is the month when the two friends in my novel, The Munich Girl, each have a birthday.

To celebrate, the novel’s Kindle version is currently offered at its biggest discount ever for a short time across most worldwide Amazon markets.

And, on February 10, I’ll draw a winner for a signed print copy of the book and a silver butterfly bracelet designed by artist Diane Kirkup.

Those who’ve read the book know that a variety of objects help unfold the trail of the story. One of these is the image of a butterfly.

To enter the drawing, send an email to: info[at]phyllisring[dot]com

with “Butterfly” in the subject line.

All three women in The Munich Girl have strong connections with Germany, where two of them meet just before World War II.

Peggy, is a Leap-year baby with “29 February” on her birth certificate. That kind of thing can make you feel like a fictional character right out of the starting gate.

EB pix Germany and more 610Eva Braun, always wanted to live the life of a character in a movie or novel. However, as many women have, and still do, she gives her life away to someone who hasn’t the capacity to value it, or, it would seem, to care for humanity at all.

“Did she really love him? How could she ever love him?” are questions I hear frequently about the woman who became “Mrs. Hitler” for the last day and a half of her life.

Anna, the story’s narrator grew up eating dinner under her father’s war-trophy portrait of Eva Braun.

Fifty years after the war, she discovers what he never did—that her mother, Peggy, and Hitler’s mistress were friends.

The secret surfaces with a mysterious monogrammed handkerchief and a man named Hannes Ritter, whose Third-Reich family history is entwined with her own. munichgirl_card_front

The pathway of this novel’s story dropped many clues in front of me, two of the biggest, a handkerchief just like the one Anna finds — and the portrait of Eva Braun, which, somehow, found me, too.

Find more about The Munich Girl: A Novel of the Legacies that Outlast War here:

http://www.amazon.com/Munich-Girl-Novel-Legacies-Outlast/dp/B01AC4FHI8


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On the trail of The Munich Girl

IMG_3242Delightful contributions and correspondence from readers have, once again, helped me make new discoveries about The Munich Girl. Reader response remains one of the biggest gifts of all in sharing a book’s story with the world.

Big thanks to Heather Heather Krishnaswamy for: reading the book, writing with kind words to let me know — then taking it with her to Europe, and ALL the way to the top of a mountain and the Kehlstein Haus, high above Berchtesgaden, Germany, so that she could send this photo.

I’m personally rather fascinated with then-and-now photos — the historic ones I pored over during my research, and the ones that readers send me as their own travels follow parts of the book’s trail.

Egaes Nest Hitler House - 020In her photo, Heather is standing quite close to where these two photos of Eva Braun and her dog were taken around 1939 or 1940. The scene is one that’s included in the book’s story.

Reader Kathy Bailey left a comment recently that feels too thoughtful to let become buried in the obscurity of internet archives.

It’s a response  to the question that never stops coming: “Why Eva Braun?” (Or, in the instance of one recent reviewer, “Why this woman?”)

EB pix Germany and more 498“Why Eva?” Kathy begins. “Because she is also a representation of Germany, a beautiful country of many good people who were swept along by something they didn’t understand and later regretted.

[Observation entirely my own own: Are we willing to — will we — learn from history ourselves, when and as we find ourselves in similar circumstance?]

“Why Eva?” Kathy continues.

“Because through her, Phyllis explored the many complexities of love. Which is not one-size-fits-all.

12939510_10209722543888161_1278498025_n“Why Eva? Because through her we come to understand Anna, who finds the courage to break from an oppressive relationship.”

Like her country, Eva Braun may not have recognized that the relationship was oppressive.

Or not until it was much too late.

Find more about The Munich Girl, (Kindle version remains discounted this month) here:

https://www.amazon.com/Munich-Girl-Novel-Legacies-Outlast-ebook/dp/B01AC4FHI8/

 — And please, keep sending your photos and thoughts.

 


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Groomed to give up their lives

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Kindle Sale ($2.99)

The Munich Girl: A Novel of the Legacies that Outlast War

https://www.amazon.com/Munich-Girl-Novel-Legacies-Outlast-ebook/dp/B01AC4FHI8/

 

It’s an extra-big blessing for me when a reader takes the time to leave reviewing feedback at such sites as Amazon and Goodreads.

It’s pure joy when those words reflect the very heart of the intentions in the novel’s story.

goodreads_icon_100x100-4a7d81b31d932cfc0be621ee15a14e70Reader Mary L. Brosmer wrote:

“I loved this novel because of its many layers: history, family, mystery, and love story.

“Above all, however, I was taken by its emotional intelligence, by the author’s descriptions of how women, even well-educated women such as the protagonist, are groomed to give up their lives for the ‘larger’ missions of their husbands and lovers.”

IMG_20151119_170505050Mary cut right to the core of what The Munich Girl invites us to explore — not just the circumstances in the life of one tyrant’s consort, but the many ways in which the feminine aspect in humanity is subjugated — Fascism being the most extreme form.

As she ponders Eva Braun’s life and the book’s themes, reader Sandra Pauer writes:

Does lack of self-confidence penetrate our psyche so deeply as to blind us to reality?

“[Do] centuries of oppression, still being treated as second rate-citizens today, skew our inner depths … blindside our ability to truly care for ourselves?

“I don’t think the author wrote this novel to redeem Eva Braun in any sense of the imagination. It served me to reflect on womanhood with our history steeped in domination and injustice.”

Find more about The Munich Girl at:

https://www.amazon.com/Munich-Girl-Novel-Legacies-Outlast-ebook/dp/B01AC4FHI8?