Leaf of the Tree

Finding the Divine in the Details


4 Comments

Biding at the center of the circle

41954803_268368097338950_1952111091853033472_n

Photo: Nelson Ashberger

A friend described the rapid, often overnight changes appearing in the garden he and his wife have tended so carefully. Just days ago, there was limitless, burgeoning life in summer’s relentless sun and heat and rainfall.

Then, like a puff of breath on a dandelion gone to seed, it is spent and gone; fading away, or into decay.

In New England especially, these changes arrive as abruptly as the night chill that turns the leaves from green to scarlet.

“Stay at the center of the circle, and let all things take their course,” urges the Tao Te Ching.

Out at the sharp edges of the periphery, our very human selves can feel small and overcome, overwhelmed, in the inevitable enormity of change. The mind, confounded, struggles for purchase it can’t find.

37733340_688843094781431_4231203623113064448_n

Photo: Nancy Vincent Zinke

It’s then that a way is opened through which feelings, those unexpected guests left waiting so long in a side room, can emerge.

Autumn, in particular, with its cycles of death and harvest, seems well-suited for inviting forth the grief and pain that so much effort has tried so long to avoid, or contain.

Those seeds of unclaimed treasure found only in a heart broken open.

The center of the circle, that trustworthy core, can hold these, and us, as it holds all, and remind of what Rumi saw with such kind wisdom:

35522787_656520498013691_2584923167994675200_n

Photo: Nancy Vincent Zinke

Today, like every other day, we wake up empty
and scared.

Don’t open the door to the study
and begin reading. Take down a musical instrument.

Let the beauty we love be what we do. 
There are hundreds of ways to kneel and kiss the earth.

What is the beauty we love?

What are those hundreds of ways?

Advertisements


3 Comments

What few put into practice

5x7pondforphyllis

“Pond”, Lauren Chuslo-Shur

Sometimes, things I stumble across just seem to dance together.
Maybe this is the way Universal Divine Mind waves at me.

This time, the partners are a poem from my friend Ronnie Tomanio,
and long-enduring wisdom from Lao Tzu:

MorrellFalls2

“Morrell Falls 2”, Judy Hughey Wright

The supreme good is like water,
which nourishes all things without trying to.
~
Nothing in the world
is as soft and yielding as water.
Yet for dissolving the hard and inflexible,
nothing can surpass it.
The soft overcomes the hard;
the gentle overcomes the rigid.
Everyone knows this is true,
but few can put it into practice.
~
Whoever is soft and yielding
is a disciple of life.

~ Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching

The Practical Moon

by Ronnie Tomanio

sunburstlr

“Sunburst”, Lauren Chuslo-Shur

When was that moment?
The cucumber becoming a pickle moment
When I became … dare I say it out loud …
Practical
The moment when dancing clouds became water vapor
When the heart sun within
Became burning hydrogen without
No longer just two friends
Playing peek-a-boo
I see you
In the sky of blue
All day long

makehaymoonshineslr

“Make Hay While the Moon Shines”, Lauren Chuslo-Shur

Until the practical moon
That battered, solemn head
Says bedtime
I obey
But I can still dream
Of endless ascendant mornings.


6 Comments

Waiting till the mud settles

NAcloudwaterIMG_3135

Gleanings here and there:

When the urgent crowds out the important, people urgently accomplish nothing of value.
~ Orrin Woodward

We have multiplied our possessions, but reduced our values.

~ Dr. Bob Moorehead Iceland 004

Do you have the patience to wait

till your mud settles and the water is clear?

Can you remain unmoving

till the right action arises by itself?

~Tao Te Ching