Leaf of the Tree

Finding the Divine in the Details


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The gifts of our unique spiritual fingerprint

The ways in which each of us chooses to show love, receive forgiveness, and express other attributes is our own spiritual fingerprint, and just like our physical fingerprint, it is unique to us.

Nobody in the past, present, or future will love exactly the same way that each of us does.

Each time that we give or receive, an attribute of God – a facet of the infinite jewel – is revealed.

In this way, we make an invaluable contribution because we have added to what can be perceived of divinity.

And because we are all capable of making such a contribution, this means that each individual is absolutely indispensable.

When we give or receive acts of service, we become engaged in the process of investigating our own reality and gradually, more is revealed about who we really are.

In that process, we gradually disperse the dust and veils of an illusory identity that has been formed by living in a culture that is immersed in blind imitation of the past.

Once those veils are lifted, we encounter and discover our true and unique individual identity.

The process begins with a genuine act of service that is always motivated by the attributes of God that are latent within each of our hearts. It is our free-will decision that brings forth these “gems of inestimable value”.

 

Excerpted from With Thine Own Eyes: Why Imitate the Past When We Can Investigate Reality?

Find more about the book at: https://www.amazon.com/Thine-Own-Eyes-Imitate-Investigate-ebook/dp/B00I1JPC7I

Print version available at: http://www.bahairesources.com/with-thine-own-eyes.html

 

 

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A path of service and self-discovery

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Photo: David Campbell

When we translate the spiritual inspiration we receive into a genuine act of service, our motivation is most likely one of improving our relationships.

But something far deeper also transpires, though it may go unnoticed, at first. We are bringing out from the latent state of potentiality our true self and purpose.

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Image: Judy Hughey Wright

The genuine acts of service that we have exchanged with another person in this world form the eternal part of our relationship that transcends this material world. The material gifts we exchange with loved ones will return to dust, but the love we show them will last forever.

What is the connection between relationships and the concept of investigating our own reality?

Our personal investigation is an abstract endeavor and it can be difficult to assess progress. However, the more successful we are in uncovering our true self, the better the decisions we will make regarding our lives and the people in them, which translates into healthier and happier relationships. This will provide us with tangible evidence that we are making progress on the path of service and self-discovery.

WTOEimage.phpTo live to our highest potential, it seems that we need to come into consciousness of our true selves and also to establish a balance between our being and our doing that is rooted in our truest purpose.

Explore these and related themes in With Thine Own Eyes: Why Imitate the Past When We Can Investigate Reality? published by George Ronald Publisher

Find more about the book at:

http://www.amazon.com/With-Thine-Own-Eyes-Investigate-ebook/dp/B00I1JPC7I/ref=pd_sim_kstore_11?ie=UTF8&refRID=0TQC490J7FVBRTJWM70H

and in print version at:

http://www.bahairesources.com/with-thine-own-eyes.html

 

 

 

 


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Awareness unwraps the gift

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Imagine we are desert-bound souls desperately seeking water. If we are offered anything but water we will turn away. We might be offered a change of clothes, food, shelter — all good things. But the desperate nature of life-threatening thirst will cause the thirsty one to reject what is offered as if the offering were poison.

September 2007 227When we experience intense suffering personally, our world seems to narrow dramatically and become very small. Imagine the intense pain we feel when we sustain a deep burn or when we sustain a loss. Do we really care at that moment about any other needs in our life, no matter how legitimate they are? The need that seems most desperate can crowd out of our consciousness all other needs until that need is met, whether it is removing our hand from a heat source, healing from grief or quenching our thirst with life-giving water.

Israel 139If it is our desperate need to discover our authentic self and purpose, then once we know that true identity and purpose and understand the most beneficial ways to act, we’ll be ready for other things.

Without the awareness and involvement of our spiritual nature — who we truly are — our life is rather like a gift we can never unwrap nor fully receive.

Excerpted from With Thine Own Eyes: Why Imitate the Past When We Can Investigate Reality?, coming soon from George Ronald Publisher.