Leaf of the Tree

Finding the Divine in the Details


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Writing’s invitation to wholeness

Eva Braun taking her love of animals to an extreme.

I’m very grateful to share a guest post at the creative blog of writer Nicola Auckland.

Nicola was one of the very first to read and review my novel, The Munich Girl, and offer insightful feedback about it.

Her Sometimes Stellar Storyteller blog features delightful Six Word Story challenges, and explores one of my favorite things — creative process.

As she hosts me this week, I’ve done my best to address some of my own experience with it:

“Nine years ago, I made a bid on an eBay item that would change my life in ways I couldn’t have imagined at the time.

“Something within me was strongly drawn to it, though I didn’t yet understand why. It was a portrait of Eva Braun drawn by an artist who never gained acclaim for his work — though his infamous name is branded on history forever. Eva Braun chose to die with him 72 years ago this spring.

“That portrait is at the heart of everything that became a part of my latest novel’s story, set largely in the Germany of World War II. The experience of writing The Munich Girl showed me that, rather than being something I ‘do,’ writing is a process that acts upon me, strengthening my sense of connection with my own wholeness.

“My responsibility, I feel, is to listen and watch, rather than impose ideas or plans of my own on what comes forth as a story.

“Albert Einstein described the intuitive mind as ‘a sacred gift’ and the rational mind as ‘a faithful servant.’ We have, he said, ‘created a society that honors the servant, and has forgotten the gift.’ ”

READ THE WHOLE POST AT:

Stellar Guest Post from Phyllis Ring

 

 


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“Things were almost always more complex than they appeared.”

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Publishing a book is a gateway to the unexpected in countless ways, as well as a nonstop curve of learning and discovery.

One delightful part of the experience is encountering the connection that readers make with a book, its world, and its story.

In her review at Goodreads, reader Mary Spires called The Munich Girl “a story of love, power and the meaning of family.” goodreads_icon_100x100-4a7d81b31d932cfc0be621ee15a14e70

She wrote:

“Readers see 1930s and ’40s Germany through the eyes of young women growing into adulthood. In the midst of increasing chaos, they fall in love, develop allegiances and make sacrifices. While family secrets unfold to the next generation, we see how their support for one another has allowed each to play out her role in a period of transition. These themes cross barriers of time, nationality and political persuasion.”

MunichGirlWebAdAs a lover of historical fiction, I have read from a variety of different perspectives of World War II,” writes reviewer Melissa Lee. “However this was the first time I had read about German citizens who lived ‘freely’ in the presence of the Third Reich. I use the word ‘freely’ loosely, as regular German citizens were far from free during Hitler’s reign. …

“I was pleased that this book wasn’t centered around, or bogged down with the politics of World War II. Instead it was more of a tale about friendship, sacrifices and legacies.” tumblr_mt4oxuoa4b1s7jim8o1_1280

Reading The Munich Girl was like taking a journey to another place and another time,” writes Cynthia Minor. “It is difficult to know where the ‘real’ ends and the ‘possible’ begins.The story weaves itself across continents and decades, and is a beautiful image of the way our lives are not only connected to those we know and share life with, but with those in our past, whom we may or may not even be aware of.

scnee s-l500“As the author states:

‘One could look at another’s life and judge or envy what it seemed to show. But things were almost always more complex than they appeared.’

This was and is still true, of everyone we meet.”

 

Find the Goodreads page for The Munich Girl here:

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/27914910-the-munich-girl#other_reviews


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Blue Million fun – and a reading sale for every hemisphere

12939510_10209722543888161_1278498025_nAuthor Amy Metz at A Blue Million Books generously shared the chance for a fun interview this week.

Among a host of thought-provoking questions, she revealed some of my murderous tendencies:

Have you ever killed off a character fictionally, as revenge for something someone did in real life?

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Photo: Diane Kirkup

[Semi-spoiler alert:]

Oh, my, did I ever. :).  One of the most fun experiences I have with my newest book is when friends call up to tell me how satisfied THEY felt when they got to that part.

What would your main character say about you?

“Ease up. Be gentle, and grateful. Don’t miss the good stuff.”

What’s the hardest thing you’ve ever had to write? Why?

The memorial for a 90-year-old artist friend who’d had a remarkable life. He was one of my earliest mentors. It was hard because I also had to read it at the funeral and knew I wasn’t likely to make it through. It helped me give myself permission to cry in public, when that’s what my heart needs to do.

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“Marketing”: Well, there’s always leaving it around in somewhat obvious places, hoping someone will find it 🙂

Do you have any marketing tips you could pass on to indie authors?

Oh, lord — I think you have to really believe in your work, in the way a parent believes in a child because she knows his or her innermost strengths, even when others can’t see them.

In promoting my books, I strive for a balance between the innovative and creative and the non-intrusive — finding creative ways to make a book discoverable without alienating or annoying anyone. After being published by trade publishers, then going it alone, I’ve learned that it is appreciative readers, more than any other factor, that can best help potential readers find a book, and understand why they’d want to read it. So an important focus is how to reach and build connection with those readers who will connect with your work.

AND — you can always lower a book’s price!!!

Just in time for summer (or Southern-Hemisphere winter) reading — 

SALE for the Kindle version of The Munich Girl: A Novel of the Legacies that Outlast War –

Albert Marquet - Jardin du Luxembourg, 1898. Oil on canvas, 15 x 17 3_4 in. (38 x 45 cm). @ Sotheby's Images, London_n

Albert Marquet – Jardin du Luxembourg, 1898. Oil on canvas.

  $2.99 US (*)

Find it at:

https://www.amazon.com/Munich-Girl-Novel-Legacies-Outlast-ebook/dp/B01AC4FHI8/

(*Also discounted in all countries with an Amazon marketplace.)

 

Read my interview with Amy Metz of A Blue Million Books at:

http://abluemillionbooks.blogspot.com/2016/06/featured-author-phyllis-edgerly-ring.html


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Another view: Through readers’ eyes

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Publishing a book is a gateway to the unexpected in countless ways, as well as a nonstop curve of learning and discovery.

One of the most delightful parts of the experience is the way it reconnects you with people you know, and opens the door to a whole world of making new friends.

Reader Mary Spires and I met years ago at a writer’s conference but I haven’t seen her since she traveled half a world away and back. In her review at Goodreads, she called The Munich Girl “a story of love, power and the meaning of family” and wrote: “Readers see 1930s and ’40s Germany through the eyes of young women growing into adulthood. In the midst of increasing chaos, they fall in love, develop allegiances and make sacrifices. While family secrets unfold to the next generation, we see how their support for one another has allowed each to play out her role in a period of transition. These themes cross barriers of time, nationality and political persuasion.” munichgirl_card_front

Reader Linda Marie Marsh approached me very politely after I’d held a giveaway for the book and she hadn’t managed to be one of the winners. I’m so grateful that she proved the maxim: “If you don’t ask, the answer’s always no,” and, in her courteous courage, opened the door to a friendship that the book and I are so grateful to have.

goodreads_icon_100x100-4a7d81b31d932cfc0be621ee15a14e70“I KNOW it’s quite early in the year,” she wrote at Goodreads on February 1, “but I will say this anyway. The Munich Girl will be one of the best books I read this year … The author has taken and blended a mix of stories and created a whopper of historical fiction — well-kept secrets, unknown family ties, true friendship, and an ease of flowing back and forth in time — from the 1930s and ’40s to the present day. I have always wondered why Eva Braun Hitler was assumed to be a blonde ditz and historically shoved aside. Phyllis Ring uses words to make a page-flattened person become whole, become real, and gives us a 3-dimensional woman who had brains, beauty and just happened to fall for the charms of a sociopath. Yes, I loved that aspect, but there was so much more to the ‘what if’ novel. I devoured it.”

EvaHertaNA242EB27_39DReader Cynthia Minor is another book friend of the heart with whom I’ve been connected through the virtual world, and through a wonderful writer named Donna Baptiste. In her thoughts about the book, Cynthia wrote at Goodreads: “It is difficult to know where the ‘real’ ends and the ‘possible’ begins. Reading The Munich Girl was like taking a journey to another place and another time. … The story weaves itself across continents and decades, and is a beautiful image of the way our lives are not only connected to those we know and share life with, but with those in our past, whom we may or may not even be aware of. 424

“As the author states: ‘One could look at another’s life and judge or envy what it seemed to show. But things were almost always more complex than they appeared.’ This was and is still true, of everyone we meet.”

What a privilege it is for this writer, that the pathway of a book and its story leads to meeting so many thoughtful souls.

Find the Goodreads page for The Munich Girl here:

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/27914910-the-munich-girl#other_reviews

 

 


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“Local author” life

IMG_4080My thanks to editor Rebecca Skane of Portsmouth Review for the interview she offered me this month.

And my gratitude to Stef Kiper Schmidt at Water Street Bookstore in Exeter, NH, for including me in this month’s visiting-authors calendar, AND creating such a wonderful window display for The Munch Girl!

waterlogoIf you’re near enough on the evening of Wednesday, March 23, come by and say hello and hear a little of the story behind the book.

 

Meanwhile, here are a few questions from Portsmouth Review:

 

424What is the most critical piece of advice you would give to new authors?

Be unceasingly willing to persevere, learn, and come to understand just what part of your inner blueprint your work most truly wants to represent, and how the process itself brings you closer to that reality, i.e. creativity and spirit want to shape each other, and us.

Coming up with a title can be difficult. Tell me how you came up with yours.

It came once I’d seen the rendering of the book’s cover, and I couldn’t believe I hadn’t understood earlier what it had to be. Munich’s the place that unites the lives of all three main characters, instantly conveys the story’s German atmosphere, and was, at heart, the way Eva Braun saw herself – reflected in some of her very last words: a Munich girl. The subtitle helped round out the story’s deeper themes: A Novel of the Legacies that Outlast War.

Find the interview here: http://portsmouthreview.com/interview-local-author-phyllis-edgerly-ring/


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Warmest thanks in wintry days

IMG_5991It’s a writer’s never-ending delight to hear from readers.

Recently a thoughtful one sent this image of Snow Fence Road that evokes how inviting it can feel to curl up with a book on days of wintry chill – or in the sunshine, maybe at the beach, for those of you in our southern sister hemisphere.

Reader Sabrina Laumer touched on an atmospheric theme of her own in a review at Goodreads:

“This book was absorbing and comforting, with characters that were engaging and distinctive.

Set in a frozen winter scene in Maine, it made me feel like curling up with a hot cup of tea while I read.goodreadsh 

… a story that keeps you engaged and guessing at its secrets right up until the the truth is revealed.”

Dear readers and friends, at the start of the year that’s the halfway mark of the decade, I thank you for the time you make to read my books, and your generous response of telling others about them, whether with helpful reviews or the other sharing and recommending that you do. It’s a blessing. I especially love receiving photos of readers with the book, or of the book in far-flung parts of the world.

My thanks, too, to those book clubs in Virgina and Maine who’ve added the book to your 2015 reading list. I’m always happy to “visit” with clubs, virtually or in-person, and I offer discounts for group purchases.

IMG_2717Through all of publishing’s unexpected developments and surprises, I have a heart full of gratitude for the grace of being able to share with readers those nagging scenes and stories that won’t leave me alone until I help them find their way onto pages.

It looks as though 2015 may be the year to bring out two more of them in new books.

If you’d like to be on my mailing list, simply follow the blog, or send a request to info@phyllisring.com

Find more about Snow Fence Road, and all of my books in print or Kindle, at:

http://www.amazon.com/Phyllis-Edgerly-Ring/e/B001RXUFD6/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0


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The kind gift of right-timing

DSCF3564Happy to have a piece up at BoomerCafé this week, as I strike out on the trail of a new novel, while reflecting on what my first one has revealed for me.

I had lots of expectations for my first novel when I began writing it in my 30s. Never did I imagine that when it was finally published, my strongest feeling would be, “Thank heaven this didn’t happen sooner.”

This stage of life reinforces that anything of value is not only worth waiting for, but subject to a right-timing factor we can never predict. Snow Fence Road Cover

Snow Fence Road looked ready to fly more than 20 years ago when a respected literary agency agreed to represent it. Things seemed on-track for success until life brought changes in the outer world that decided otherwise.

Today, it’s my inner world that appreciates this the most.

Today it’s a different book, in a different world, and I’m a writer with a far different perspective. Two decades ago, this book most likely had a narrow (i.e. months-long) window of time and opportunity to reach readers. Now its possibilities seem as wide as my willingness to follow an ever-unfolding learning curve. Social media and a digital world extend a global reach that astonishes me almost as much as the role readers themselves now play in advancing awareness of and appreciation for the book.

Yes, there are wildly shifting sands in the publishing experience now, but there are horizons I couldn’t have imagined 25 years ago.

READ THE ARTICLE HERE: http://www.boomercafe.com/2014/04/02/boomer-authors-reflections-finishing-book-later-life/#comment-95173

Find more about Snow Fence Road, from Black Lyon Publishing, at: http://www.amazon.com/Snow-Fence-Road-Phyllis-Edgerly/dp/1934912549/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1372083362&sr=8-2&keywords=Snow+Fence+Road+Phyllis+Ring