Leaf of the Tree

Finding the Divine in the Details


2 Comments

The legacies that outlast

tree10968479_10152682243063951_1511570741295508277_n

Image: Cary Enoch / https://enochsvision.com/

In these times when writing and publishing a book can feel like pinning a leaf in a forest, book bloggers are some of a writer’s very kindest friends.

I’m grateful to reviewer Courtney of Incessant Bookworm blog for her insightful response to The Munich Girl:

“Ring incorporates some unique twists that in the end wind into my believing that everything happens for a reason and what may seem random and irrelevant becomes groundbreaking.

IMG_7817

Photo: Diane Kirkup

“Two moving passages from the story encompass the main take away for me – coincidentally on the same page – and have a strong and clear parallel to the subtitle:

‘Sometimes, we must outlast even what seems worse than we have imagined, because we believe in the things that are good. So that there can be good things again.’

‘I’m realizing now that war leaves so many different kinds of legacies … Some stay buried. Many are part-truths that become legends or myths. Many others are what we know are there but try to deny or ignore.’

goodreads_icon_100x100-4a7d81b31d932cfc0be621ee15a14e70

Find the review from Courtney’s Incessant Bookworm Blog here at Goodreads:

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1566157867

 

IMG_2408Also, a Giveaway for

The Munich Girl: A Novel of the Legacies that Outlast War

continues at Stacie Theis’s Beach Bound Books Blog:

http://www.beachboundbooks.com/2/post/2016/02/the-munich-girl-by-phyllis-edgerly-ring-book-review-giveaway.html


2 Comments

Yes! Finally! The Munich Girl

372706883-friedrich-braun-gretl-braun-franziska-braun-eva-braun
The Munich Girl is now, at last — really — available to order at Amazon —
and at any bookstore or book-sales outlet where readers prefer to shop.
 
Thank you so much to the readers who have already journeyed through the story and are sending your feedback and response, and to those who are posting your reader reviews and telling others about the book. Author, Eric Mondschein, my special thanks for your review:
 
5.0 out of 5 starsThe Munich Girl is definitely a Keeper!, November 22, 2015
munichgirl_card_front
“The Munich Girl … both a mystery and a love story.  … a woman’s quest to discover why there was a portrait of Eva Braun, Adolf Hitler’s mistress, hanging on the wall in her family’s dining room and just what connection, if any, Braun had with her family.
The story introduces us to Eva Braun and the time just before and during World War II in Germany. But it is also so much more. It is about the human spirit, survival, friendship, love, betrayal, discovery and denial as the reader is taken on a journey through time and place. Ring draws the reader in with her unique ability to bring her characters to life—and compels you to want to get to know them.
Although this is a work of fiction, it is also an historical portrait about real-life characters. Ring paints a mosaic through dialogue and setting that allows for the possibility to imagine that this story just might have taken place.”
And, my gratitude to columnist, reader and reviewer Leslie Handler:
Fiction So Convincing, You’ll Think It’s Real –
277adb383d236e345fda3078dae95618
“I knew I was reading fiction, but the read felt so unusually personal that I couldn’t shake the feeling that maybe, just maybe, it was an actual memoir of the author’s mother and her real life relationship with the girlfriend of the world’s most infamous figure.
And then I found out the truth. Phyllis Ring actually owns the real portrait of Eva Braun! A fiction, truly based on facts, Ring’s newest novel is a must read.”
Find more about The Munich Girl: A Novel of the Legacies That Outlast War at:


7 Comments

Author of wild, unpredictable circumstance: my dad

2005 China Slide Show 001Eight years after my father’s death, a memory of him blooms as faithfully each June as the flowers erupting all around.

Days after his death, I was lamenting the achingly empty rooms of his house when something pulled my attention to his back garden.

The brilliance waiting there nearly bowled me over — I remember literally gasping to get my breath back. Every bush, shrub, and bulb he’d ever planted seemed to be in bloom at once, ecstatic testimony to the indomitable nature of life itself.

That indefatigable blooming brought to mind the last bit of gardening we’d done together the year before. Dad had a little strip of land on which he planted impatiens each year. That June, I’d spied two trays of them on his patio and realized that, since he could barely walk any longer, there was no way he could plant them. September 2007 225

We were quite a team that day, “helped” by his ever-eager miniature schnauzer, Patsy, namesake of the saint on whose day she was born. Dad churned up the soil with a long-handled trowel while I followed, nestling the little plants into place. It had just rained so the job was messy, the mosquitoes thick, and Patsy a determined quality-control inspector (i.e. right in my face) as I hunkered over those beds.

I knew the task was one of the very last things we’d do together.

Year by year, I discover the many intangibles my father helped bring to bloom. The day of my UMass graduation, he pulled the car to the side of the road on a rise that overlooks Amherst (he was inclined to try and execute things with a flourish), turned around to where I sat in back, and announced: “You graduated. And you did well. But most important is that you kept going. You didn’t give up. In time, you’ll value that more than anything else.” 11010530_988410544523863_8454246950852480917_n

This June’s new bloom is the next book that will take wing soon, the one on which I’ve been working since right after I met his eyes and watched him take his last breath that June day in 2007. As steeped as The Munich Girl is in Germany and World War II, he unquestionably had something to do with the wild combination of unpredictable circumstances that steered me headlong into it. (Wild combinations of unpredictable circumstances were one of his hallmarks, too.)

And yes, yet again, he was absolutely right about the value of perseverance, whose importance always becomes more visible in the light of time.

IMG_7118Thinking about plants and growth, I’m reminded of an instance in which ‘Abdu’l-Bahá counseled someone who’d experienced the loss of a loved one that while the pain of physical separation remains for those left behind, for the one who dies, it’s as though a wise and kind gardener has transplanted a struggling plant to a wider, more welcoming place where it can reach a whole new level of growth.

Many things in life, as well as death, bring that home to us each day.

Bloom on, Dad. And thanks for that reminder, much more useful than my degree ever was.

coverthumbFrom Life at First Sight: Finding the Divine in the Details.

More about the book at:

http://www.amazon.com/Life-First-Sight-Finding-Details/dp/1931847673/ref=pd_sim_b_1?ie=UTF8&refRID=1FYGVM9S5BGBZH2TJHR4